1997 Sunflower Grower Survey of Pest Problems and Pesticide Use 


Ranking of Sunflower Production of States Surveyed

North Dakota was first nationally in 1997 in all sunflower production, oilseed sunflower production and confection sunflower production. North Dakota had 51% of all, 50% of oilseed and 56% of the nation's confection acreage. North Dakota had 1,470,000 sunflower acres planted in 1997 and 1,410,000 acres harvested, with a yield of 1,321 lb/A and production of 1,862,900,000 lb. The value of the 1996 North Dakota crop, when 1,165,000 acres were harvested, was $206,524,000. South Dakota ranked second in all sunflower, oilseed sunflower and confection sunflower production. Kansas ranked third in all sunflower and in oilseed sunflower production and Minnesota ranked fourth in all sunflower and oilseed sunflower production. Texas and Nebraska ranked third and fourth, respectively, in confection sunflower production (5, 6).

Total planted acreage in the four states surveyed was 2,665,000 acres, or 91% of the nation's 2,920,000 planted acres. Planted oilseed acreage in these four states was 2,160,000 acres, or 94% of the nation's 2,292,000 planted oilseed acres. Planted confection acreage in these four states was 505,000 acres, or 80% of the nation's 628,000 planted confection acres (6).

 

RESULTS

Responses

Six hundred and ten usable forms were returned, amounting to 7.5% of forms mailed, considerably less than the 14% usable forms returned in 1994 (4). The respondents and percent responses for each state in 1997 were : KS, 103 or 4.3%; MN, 83 or 5.9%; ND, 261 or 11.0%; and SD, 163 or 8.4% (Table 1).

Acres Planted By Respondents

Respondents in the four states planted 216,594 acres or 8% of the 2,665,000 acres planted by all growers in these states (6). KS respondents planted 24,615 acres, or 12% of the KS total sunflower acres of 230,000; MN respondents planted 22,646 acres, or 22% of the MN total of 105,000 acres; ND respondents planted 92,873 acres, or 6% of the ND total of 1,500,000 acres; SD respondents planted 76,460 acres, or 9% of the SD total of 830,000 acres (Table 2). The ND acreage represented in the survey is a significant number since only 25% of ND growers received the survey form. The percentage of total acres represented by respondents' acres was 8%, down from 12% in 1994 (4). The respondents' planted acres represented 7% of the total 2,920,000 sunflower acres planted in the United States.

Confection sunflower planted by respondents was 7% of respondents' total sunflower crop in KS, 35% in MN, 25% in ND and 2% in SD (Tables 3 and 4). The percent of respondents' acres planted to confection sunflower was lower in KS than in 1994, higher in MN, and slightly higher in ND and SD (4). The percent of planted acres harvested was 98% in KS, 94% in SD, 93% in ND, and 89% in MN (Table 3). Most irrigated sunflower was grown in KS, where 17% of KS respondents' acres were planted (Tables 3 and 5). Irrigated acreage was very small in the other three states. The majority of irrigated acres in KS were planted to oilseed sunflower (Table 3), as in 1994.

 

Major Sunflower Producing Counties Represented by Survey

KS counties with the largest number of acres reported by respondents were Sherman, Cheyenne and Wallace. MN counties with the largest number of acres reported by respondents were Kittson, Polk, Marshall, Pennington, Roseau, Red Lake and Clay. ND counties with the largest number of acres reported by respondents were Barnes, Stutsman, La Moure, Wells, Foster and Benson. These data contrast to total acres planted, according to the North Dakota Agricultural Statistics Service, with the largest number of acres planted in Stutsman, Barnes, La Moure, Dickey, Nelson, Ramsey, Benson and Foster (5). Thus, Dickey, Nelson and Ramsey were under-represented in the survey. On the other hand, the three counties with the largest number of acres in the survey were also the counties with the largest number of acres planted, according to the North Dakota Agricultural Statistics Service. SD counties with the largest number of acres reported by respondents were Beadle, Edmunds, Sully, Brown, Hand and Faulk (Table 6). Many of these are the same counties that were leading sunflower producing counties in 1994. The majority of irrigated acres reported was in Sherman County, KS.

 

Sunflower Planting Dates

KS respondents planted sunflower from before May 1 to after July 31, but the majority was planted in June and early July (Table 7). Some of the late planting dates in KS may be due to double cropping following winter wheat harvest. Sunflower was planted earlier in the northern states than in KS. MN respondents planted most of their acreage in the period May 11 to June 10, with over half of total acres planted May 21-30. ND respondents planted most of their acreage in the period May 21-June 10. SD respondents planted most of their acreage in the period May 11-June 10, with the greatest percentage planted in the period June 1-10.

 

Sunflower Yields

Yields varied among and within the states. Over half of KS respondents reported yields of 751-1,250 lb/A. In MN, over half of respondents reported yields of 751-1,500 lb/A. In ND, over half of respondents reported yields of 1,001-1,500 lb/A. In SD, over two thirds of respondents reported yields of 1,251-2,000 lb/A. Yields over 2,000 lb/A were rare in all four states (Table 8).

 

Production Problems

Diseases were rated as the worst production problem on 30% of KS respondents' acres, followed by weeds on 20%. Diseases were the worst production problem on 39% of MN respondents' acres, followed by insects on 32%. Bird damage was the worst production problem on 23% of ND respondents' acres, followed by insects on 20%. Emergence and stand establishment was the worst production problem on 31% of SD respondents' acres, followed by weeds on 20% (Table 9).

Problems ranked among the three worst production problems in KS were insects, on 67% of respondents' acres, followed by weeds on 50%, harvesting on 46% and diseases on 40%. Diseases were ranked among the three worst production problems on 79% of MN respondents' acres, followed by insects on 64% and weeds on 55%. Weeds were ranked among the three worst production problems on 68% of ND respondents' acres, followed by bird damage and insects each on 51% and emergence and stand establishment on 41%. Weeds were ranked among the three worst production problems on 63% of SD respondents' acres, followed by insects on 54% and emergence and stand establishment on 45% (Table 9).

 


This site was last updated on November 15, 2002

 

202 Hultz Hall
Department of Entomology
College of Agriculture
Fargo, North Dakota 58105-5346
Phone: (701) 231-7581
FAX: (701) 231-8557

For more information, please contact:

Extension Entomologist: Phillip Glogoza   pglogoza@ndsuext.nodak.edu